Thursday, November 4, 2010

Contact for CCSVI tracking project

If you are having trouble getting signed up for the tracking project, please send an e-mail to margreet who is at ccsvi-tracking.com and is managing the site (I'm not putting the @ in there so she doesn't get spam).

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  4. Jessica Davis, diagnosed with MS in 2003, of Somerset, UK agrees: “I have my life back thanks to CCSVI Clinic and it’s the best thing I ever did for myself. They weren’t easy to find but I did my homework.” She continues: “I had to be my own advocate for both liberation therapy and the stem cells because I got no help from my own neurologist. From the day I was diagnosed, my MS was aggressive. I didn’t have much time to take action before I would get to the point where just getting out of the flat would become impossible. I was using a cane and so tired all the time. After the 12 days at CCSVI Clinic, the first thing that cleared up was the head fog and my (incontinence) and the rest has come back over the past six months. I am working again and I consider myself cured.”
    “These are typical stories for all types of neuro-degenerative diseases we are treating through CCSVI Clinic. At least with MS we are seeing significant improvement in many patients and I believe this trend of outcomes will continue” says Gupte. “We have also had some significantly positive outcomes with ALS and (cerebral) palsy. With the results we have seen in the past year, I think that the promise of stem cells is coming closer to matching the reality.”For mor details visit http://ccsviclinic.ca/

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  5. What isn’t yet accepted in the medical community is that stem cell transplantation demonstrates a new approach for supporting restoration of tissue through remyelination. Through multiple clinical trials that have already proceeded to phase III, it has been well-established that mesenchymal stem cells moderate responses of the disease and stimulate repair of the central nervous system. In these studies, adult autologous mesenchymal stem cells have not only been safely administered to MS patients but have proven effective as a potential therapy for MS. Approved Clinical Trials involving small numbers of patients have occurred for the past half decade in medical centers outside of North America. As a result, various medical treatment centers have already derived protocols for extraction, culture, and treatment of MS patients with autologous stem cells. A review of popular medical journals actually reveals a widespread consensus on the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation as a therapy for MS patients.
    After 18 months of treating MS patients, CCSVI Clinic is well along with its program. “Success means different things to different people, but I’d say we’ve had much more than we could have hoped for when we first started.” says Dr. Avneesh Gupte, Neurosurgeon with CCSVI Clinic. “For the past year we’ve been adding autologous mesenchymal stem cell transplantation to the liberation therapy procedure and that’s when we really started to notice a significant change in patient outcomes”For more details visit http://ccsviclinic.ca/

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  6. Strategic Importance of Jugular Vein Dilatation Otherwise Known as ‘Liberation Therapy’
    The Combination Therapy includes neck vein dilatation based on the findings of Zamboni, et al. The vein dilatation or venoplasty therapy provides the appropriate drainage of the CNS that prevents a retrograde pressure exertion on the myelin sheath covering the CNS. Whatever triggers the autoimmune system to turn on in people predisposed to MS, this back-pressure needs to be resolved. In case after case, the typical symptoms of MS retreat in individuals where the veins are expanded and the flow pressures are equalized. Since keeping the jugular and azygous veins fully open is the key to reducing MS symptoms, it is of paramount importance to know what other post-procedure factors create enduring effect in the venous flow. For example, there is now good clinical and observational evidence to support the fact that stem cells (transplanted intravenously at the time of the venoplasty) reduce swelling, thrombin buildup, clotting and subsequent permanent intraluminal damage leading to scar tissue. As to what has already been established through clinical trials and subsequent therapeutic practice, it has been found that even in patients with severely malformed or abnormal jugular vein structure, the intravenous introduction of autologous stromal cells (MSCs) post-operatively has served to repair injury attributable to venoplastic damage and desquamation of the endothelial and subendothelial cells of the interior venous lumen (tunica intima). Peak velocity, time average velocity vein area, and flow quantification have been assessed by means of echo color Doppler at periodic intervals post-venoplasty. Significant hemodynamic improvement has been recorded at the level of the veins in the neck post-venoplasty. Moreover, this additional stem cell transplantation therapy has led to increased luminal diameter and improved patency rates demonstrating that the introduction of stem cells post-operatively significantly modifies the hemodynamics of the jugular veins more effectively than venoplasty alone.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=1194 or you may call the toll free number at 888-468-1554 or info@ccsviclinic.com

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